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Academic Sutta NameNotes PSA PlaeVaggaNikayaPTSKeywords
AN.IV.28 Ariyava.msa Sutta These four traditions of the Noble Ones -- original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated, unadulterated from the beginning -- are not open to suspicion, will never be open to suspicion, and are unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives and priests. Which four?
There is the case where a monk is content with: 1. any old robe; 2. any old almsfood; 3. any old accommodation, and; 4. any old medicine.
Apart from being contented himself, he speaks in praise of being content with any old requisites. He does not do unseemly or inappropriate things in order to appropriate them. He is not agitated if he fails to acquire what he wants. He is not attached to the requisites he receives and is therefore uninfatuated, guiltless, seeing the drawbacks (of attachment to it), and discerning the escape from them. He does not, on account of his contentment with old requisites, exalt himself or disparage others. In this he is skillful, energetic, alert, and mindful. This, monks, is said to be a monk standing firm in the ancient, original traditions of the Noble Ones.
These are the four traditions of the Noble Ones -- original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated, unadulterated from the beginning -- which are not open to suspicion, will never be open to suspicion, and are unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives and priests.
And furthermore, a monk endowed with these four traditions of the Noble Ones, if he lives in the east, conquers displeasure and is not conquered by displeasure. If he lives in the west... the north... the south, he conquers displeasure and is not conquered by displeasure. Why is that? Because the wise one endures both pleasure and displeasure.
This is what the Blessed One said. Having said this, he said further: Displeasure does not conquer the enlightened one.
35/085 Catukanipaata Pa.thama Pa.n.naasaka A"nguttara A.ii.


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